Lab: Separating Materials

For the summative task of our recent Unit of Inquiry (“Matter and Materials”) I wanted to get students engaged in a fun hands-on experiment.

One of my colleagues suggested I do the “Cream to Butter” experiment (OK, I made up the name…). After researching the experiment and seeing the wonderful possibilities, I decided to take it on. I quickly created two documents- an experiment documentation sheet and another document with more general questions about separating materials.

Below is the process of our lab in the form of a lesson plan. I hope you find it interesting and use it in your own classroom:

Materials (per group):

  • A box of whipping cream (some room temperature and others fresh out of the fridge)
  • An empty bottle
  • A measuring cup
  • A timer
  • A pair of scissors
  • Scales
  • A thermometer
  • The lab sheets (the one with general questions I used is definitely optional)

Tuning-In:

  1. Ask the students what they know about separating materials (methods, tools, results, etc.)
  2. Show them the box of whipping cream. Ask them if they know what it is, what people do with it, and what the ingredients are. Then, ask them if they think they can separate what’s inside the cream.
  3. Brainstorm ideas as to how they could separate it.
  4. Tell students that today they will try to separate the whipping cream by shaking it (it is called “churning”, which is the process of shaking up cream or while milk to get butter).

The Experiment: 

  1. Preparation:
    1. Divide the students into groups of 4-5 students.
    2. Each group should get the materials listed above.
    3. Have the students cut the cream box, pour it into the empty bottle, and wait.
    4. Once all groups finished, make sure the bottle caps are screwed on tightly.

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  1. Documentation:
    • Go over the experiment sheet and make sure all students know what to write in each step.
    • Give students time to fill out the first part of the sheet:
      • The question (“what happens if I shake a bottle full of whipping cream?” and “is it possible to separate whipping cream by shaking it?” are two good examples for student questions.
      • The Background Information (they should write what they know about whipping cream and about separating materials by shaking them)

*** Their Hypothesis (“It will separate”) should not suffice. Make sure they are specific in their explanation, and that they don’t use words such as “it” to describe the bottle or the cream.

  • Once all students are done, go on to the next step.

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  1. The Experiment: (Basically, students will be shaking the bottle continuously until it completely separates. It will separate into a solid (butter) and a liquid (buttermilk), but don’t tell them yet…)
    • Students will take turns shaking the bottle. Every one minute, they will change “shaker”.

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  • After every 3 minutes (we went up to 18 minutes for the room temperature cream groups), they will stop the shaking and record their observations in their sheets. Remind them to use their senses and be as accurate as they can in their observations and records.
  • When they are done recording, they should continue the timer and the shaking.
  • After about 9 minutes, the cold whipping cream groups should have a solid (the butter) and a liquid (the buttermilk) clearly separated in their bottle. That’s pretty much the end of their experiment. They should now pour the liquid into the measuring cup, and complete the Observation section as well as the “Record the Results” section. They should spend ample time and effort on this part, continuing to observe and think of ways to describe their final product. Remind them that they might want to use the scale and the thermometer you gave them. How? They should think carefully.

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  • The room temperature group will continue to shake their bottles and record their observations every 3 minutes. You should stop them at about 15 or 18 minutes because it might just not separate…

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At this point we ended the work for the day and stretched a bit. Rigorous shaking can be hard on 10 year olds…

 

  1. Discussion:
    • Once they are all done filling out the entire sheet, discuss with the students what they did, what they noticed, and ask them why the cream of some groups did not separate (because of its temperature).
    • Ask students if they think this separation was a physical or a chemical reaction and why (it was a physical reaction, because indeed, the process can be reversed!)
    • Have students share the last question “New Question/s” as ideas for a follow-up experiment.

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*** Extension: If the question did not come up, ask them if they think the room temperature cream could still be separated if it is now placed in the fridge (it won’t, according to our experiment…). Placing some in the fridge and others leaving out could be another experiment, introducing concepts such as independent and controlled variables.

Celebration:

  • Another exciting part of this experiment is the fact that the product of their separation is completely edible!
  • Bring some bread and jam, and have some fun!

 

Learn more about the experiment:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/10/the-science-of-whipped-cream-butter-creme-fraiche.html

 

 

Guide: Become a Google Certified Educator

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As educators, no matter if we are teachers, teaching assistants, coaches, or administrators, we use technology every day. We send and receive eMail messages; share assignments with students or communicate with parents; schedule appointments; create presentations; create, analyze and share data; and so on. Google for Education is a leader in the field, and the Google for Education suite includes all of these tools for us to utilize.

In this blog entry, I share information about, and resources for two of the four certification processes Google offers to educators:

  • Google Certified Educator- Level 1
  • Google Certified Educator- Level 2
  • Google Certified Trainer
  • Google Certified Innovator

The Google Certified Educator levels 1 and 2 are quite similar (the difference is the number of Google tools and the depth of questions and assignments). The Google Certified Trainer and Innovator are quite different, and so I will leave it for a different time (although I will share some resources at the bottom of this entry.

The Exams

Once registered for the Google Certified Exam (“GCE”) (currently it costs $10 for level 1 and $25 for level 2), test-takers  receive a personal and temporary GAFE account, and are instructed to log in using an incognito window. Once logged in, test-takers are asked to sign some privacy and other agreements, are asked to take a snapshot of themselves (the webcam must stay on for the duration of the exam), and the 3-hour test begins.

Both tests are composed of two-parts. The first includes about 20 multiple choice questions about being an educator in the technological age, as well as questions about the use of Google products (Docs, Sheets, etc.). The second part include a number of authentic scenarios in the lives of teachers in which you must decide which Google tool/s to use and why, and more hands-on “assignments,” such as to create and send assignments to students using Google Classroom, organizing spreadsheets, scheduling appointments in Calendar, and so on. You have a maximum of 3 hours to complete the exam, and are not allowed to stop or pause once the exam started.

Preparing for the Exam

There are several different ways you could prepare for the exam. From experience, I would recommend that in addition to using Google products on a daily basis, you do take the time to at least go through the tutorials. The reason is that Google continuously add new tools and features, which are not always easy to figure out. Getting exposure to them prior to the exam would increase your chances of passing!

The first place to go to is Google’s Training Center, where you will find general information about the certifications Google offers. Once you understand and decide what you’re going for, it wouldn’t hurt to explore the Resources tab where you can find useful and interesting information about different tools, what innovative educators are doing with Google tools, or a place to join one of the many community of Google educators.

The next thing to do is to click on the Training tab, which will take you to the place where you choose which certification to begin training for. you can choose from the Fundamentals (GCE level 1), Advanced (GFE level 2), Devices training (for Chromebooks and Android tablets), or the Trainer training (to become a Google Certified Trainer).

If you are ready to begin studying for the Level 1 (or level 2) exam, click on the Fundamentals Training box to log in and begin the training. Alternatively, you can choose to click here to get more information about the exam, begin training, or register for the exam. All in all, for the level 1 exam, you have 13 units, and for the level 2 exam you need to go through 9 units. At the end of each unit you get a short multiple choice (or fill-in the blanks) assessment to test your skills.

Google’s Training Center is not the only place to get training for these exams, but definitely the place to start!

One last thing. Before you begin, make sure:

  • You have prepared for the exam using one of the GCE preparation tools (if you fail, you can take it again after a month, then after a year);
  • You have a working webcam (don’t have someone else take the exam for you…); and,
  • Your internet connection is adequate (I am teaching in Ethiopia where the connection is quite slow. When my connection timed-out, I was still able to refresh the page and get back to the exam with little time lost)

 

That’s it. See the resources I complied below to get more information about the certifications and more!

I hope this is helpful.

GOOD LUCK!


Certification-related resources:

  • Google has recently acquired Synergyse– a training service. Now you can get a free and innovative, interactive Chrome extension that trains you in Google Apps products.
  • Eric Curtis is an experienced technologist, blogger and trainer. His blog post about the two certifications can give you more information.
  • Kasey Bell‘s ShakeUpLearning blog offers several guides, tools and “cheatsheets” that will help you to get certified. All you have to do is sign up to receive these freebies instantly (by signing up you will receive occasional harmless eMails about technology and education). This is an “all-about-the-certificates” Google Slides presentation she used at the Texas Google Summit.
  • Information about becoming a Google Certified Trainer and Google Certified Innovator.

Other related resources:

TechTalk- 3 Effective Tools to Change a Classroom from Boring to Magnificent (Part 1)

Too often we stand in front of our students and lecture, recite familiar words that put them to sleep, make them work through endless boring worksheets, and quiz them to death.

With just a few simple tools, you can transform a day in your classroom into an interactive and fun experience for your students, and make your life easy by saving valuable time that would allow you to spend time with those who struggle or let computer algorithms calculate the results for you!

In this first post in the TechTalk series, I share 3 simple yet effective tools that will do just that:

1. TriCider– Visual collaborative decision making

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TriCider is a convenient tool that would help you and your students suggest issues, offer pros and cons, and vote for the best idea. The best functionalities about TriCider are that sign-up is optional, and that sharing with students is extremely simple. TriCider also allows users to set and change deadlines, to subscribe to updates, and the creator of the document is able to edit all other users’ input.

I recently used TriCider with my students to discuss how sleeping arrangement would be decided upon in an upcoming field trip.

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I added three “ideas”: Student choice, teacher choice, and a combination of the two, and one student added “Teacher choice, then student” (smart girl!). Then, on their laptops, students added arguments for and against each option individually. When we all added our pros and cons, students were ready to vote. It all took about 20 minutes, and the discussions around each idea and arguments were insightful, and allowed for even the quietest students to have a voice!

 

Easy decision making. Creative and collaborative.

Collect ideas, discuss and vote. That’s how tricider works. Your team will make decisions faster without meetings or calls. Innovative solutions arise because everyone can contribute ideas and vote. Whether with friends or clients: taking advantage of all the opinions and ideas to find the best solution has never been easier.


 

2. GoFormative– Interactive Worksheets

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GoFormative has the capacity to turn your classroom into a paperless one! All you have to do is upload a worksheet (as Google Doc, PDF, , and then add buttons on the sheet, which would offer more information (through videos, online tutorials, etc.), quiz students (through multiple answers or typed response), or even show how they solve problems! You can then share it with your students using a quick code. Once done, all of their work is saved, collated, and ready for you to use! What makes this an even more convenient tool is that you can view their work while they complete it, and even leave comments on their work. And you know what? It’s FREE for teachers and students!!!

On their blog you can find not only information about the site, but also great resources, such as pre-made exit tickets.

Here is a short tutorial video:

If you need more details about GoFormative, here is a lengthy and detailed video created by a teacher.


 

3. Google Forms– Making quizzes out of videos.

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By now, everyone should know about Google Forms and how convenient they can make our lives. So to save everyone’s time, I will just touch upon how simple it can be for teachers to create a video quiz which would automatically collate responses and analyze data for us. This is a great way to flip or blend your classroom! The only thing you need to do is log onto Google, create a form, embed a YouTube video in it, and add questions about the video, like the one I made below.

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The cool thing about Google Forms is that they automatically create a spreadsheet to record responses. After you sent the link to your students and they completed the quiz, you click “View Responses” (a tab in the menu at the top of the form). Doing so would open a spreadsheet (a Google Sheet), and voila! All the responses are beautifully organized in front of you:

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What’s even cooler, is that if you click the “Show summary of responses” (circled in red above), it will magically display the data in a convenient view for your analysis!

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For the more advanced and tech-savvy, Google Sheets Add-Ons, such as SuperQuiz, Flubaroo or Doctopus, can very easily grade quizzes for you, and even send customized e-mails to your students or their parents with detailed feedback about their work. The folks at Google and their third party developers make the impossible not only possible, but shockingly simple!


 

So… What are you waiting for? Get going! Make your classroom the kind of classroom all students want- fun, interactive, and differentiated!
If you have any questions about any of these tools, or would like explanations or tutorials about any other educational tool, please let me know by leaving comments.

Differentiation Workshop to Local Ethiopian Teachers

I am very fortunate that my international school has such a strong and positive relationship with our local community. Last weekend I had the fortune to participate in professional development workshops, teachers at my school were giving toteachers of our local partner school, Mekdela.

The differences between the schools are obvious (and unfortunate). One is a wealthy international school serving sons and daughters of expatriate business people, diplomats, and the likes, while the other is a public Ethiopian “government” school serving over 1600 students on two rotations due to lack of space (a morning and an afternoon shift). From teacher salaries to classroom resources, the similarities are few and far in between. This being said, as expatriates living and working in the developing world, it is (what I see as) our moral obligation to share our knowledge and skills with our local teacher counterparts in whatever ways we can think of, and so these teacher workshops were a wonderful addition to my weekend.

The professional development day included over 80 teacher participants from the Mekdela school. There were about 15 workshops offered by my school’s teachers and teaching assistants. Each workshop was designed to last two hours. Expatriates who did not speak Amharic were provided with one of our school’s TAs, who served as a mediator and translator to the participants. We were to have two such workshops throughout the day.

I chose to share my knowledge of differentiation theory and practice. Immediately after volunteering to share my knowledge at the event, I was struck with the simple and obvious question- How do you differentiate instruction when you are a traveling (“a-la-carte”) teacher who have little to no resources and 40-60 students in a classroom??? I started by taking a deep breath!

After a short visit to classrooms at the local school, several hours of presentation planning, and middle of the night consultation with colleagues, I realized whatever shape the presentation would take, it would have to be interactive (to keep the audience engaged, to build on their knowledge, skills, interests, and needs), and to include both theory AND practice sections (background is important, and so does the application aspect!) And so by the morning, my presentation was born and the classroom prepared with visual aids and concrete resources for the teachers to browse through.

The Classroom

Although I was concerned with the time element, I felt that all the background information and theory, as well as the interactive nature of the presentation, were necessary. And I must say that the workshops went quite well, aside for the fact that I did not take into consideration the delay in participants’ arrival and the time it would take to translate everything I was saying… What I assumed would be two full hours, were actually about 70 minutes of material…

Unfortunately, in the first presentation teachers had little time to work on concrete and authentic strategies for their owwn classes, which was quite disappointing to me. So I was happy that I had the time to create a packet of handouts for each participant, which included both theory and practical advice for a variety of subjects. Those, I was hoping, would allow them to reflect and experiment in their own time. Not ideal… I had to re-think the second session!

The second workshop went better. I briefly introduced slides, and let Ato Bereket, my fantastic and overly-qualified translator, to take it from there and explain concepts and ideas directly in Amharic. This allowed us to go through the material faster without compromising the discussion and content. We had more time to work on individual strategies, although another hour or two of collaborative work would have been wonderful!

All in all, this was a very successful educational day for everyone involved. After the presentations ended we got together, shared a bunna (coffee) ceremony, exchanged thank yous, took a photo together, and started our weekend…

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Upon reflection, I must sayI am very impressed with the motivation these local teachers have to improve and enrich their understanding and practice as teachers. These workshops were not mandatory, they did not get paid for attending them, and many would think that they would not be very applicable to their situation. Yet they attended, participated, stayed to ask questions, and asked if they could come in the future and observe the classroom or create some sort of a collaborative practice with us teachers.

What an inspirational day. I hope I will continue to be involved in this collaboration and be able to see how these teachers grow in their profession, and how I grow as a result of these experiences.

Here is the presentation I created:

Differentiation Workshop to Local Ethiopian Teachers

I am very fortunate that my international school has such a strong and positive relationship with the local community. One of the rewarding opportunities I had was last weekend’s professional development workshops we gave the local Mekdela school teachers.

The differences between the schools are obvious (and unfortunate). One is a wealthy international school serving sons and daughters of expat business people, diplomats, etc. while the other is a public Ethiopian “government” school. From teacher salaries to classroom resources, the similarities are few and far in between. This being said, as expatriates living and working in the developing world, it is (what I see as) our moral obligation to share our knowledge and skills with our local teacher counterparts in whatever ways we can think of, and so these teacher workshops were a wonderful addition to my weekend.

The professional development day included over 80 teacher participants from the Mekdela school. There were about 15 workshops offered by my school’s teachers and teaching assistants. Each workshop was planned to take two hours. Expatriates who did not speak Amharic were provided with one of our school’s TAs, who served as a mediator and translator to the participants. We were to have two such workshops throughout the day.

I chose to share my knowledge of differentiation theory and practice with the local teachers. After volunteering to share my knowledge at the event, I was suddenly struck with the simple and obvious question- How do you differentiate instruction when you are a traveling (“a-la-carte”) teacher who have little to no resources and 40-60 students in a classroom??? I started by taking a deep breath!

After a short visit to classrooms at the local school, several hours of presentation planning, and middle of the night consultation with colleagues, I realized it had to be an interactive presentation (to keep the audience engaged, to build on their knowledge, skills, interests, and needs), and to include both theory AND practice sections. And so my presentation was born:

Although I was concerned about the time element, I felt that all the background information and theory, as well as the interactive nature of the presentation, were necessary. And I must say that the workshop went quite well, aside for the fact that I did not take into consideration the delay in participants’ arrival as well as the time it takes to translate everything I was saying… What I assumed would be two full hours, were actually about 70 minutes of material…

In the first presentation teachers had little time to work on concrete and authentic strategies for their classes, which was quite disappointing to me. So I was happy that I had the time to create a packet of handouts for each participant, which included both theory and practical advice for a variety of subjects. Those, I was hoping, would allow them to reflect and experiment in their own time. Not ideal…

The second workshop went better. I introduced slides, and let Ato Bereket, my fantastic and overly qualified translator, to take it from there and explain concepts and ideas directly in Amharic. This allowed us to go through the material faster without compromising the discussion and content.

The Classroom

RIP Google Search in the Classroom

I am not sure how many educators knew of the outstanding Google Search feature called “Reading Levels”. It allowed for any researcher to filter search results by… yes, reading levels! Google’s algorithm calculated the complexity level of words in the website/article, and placed each site into one of three groups: Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced.

Google Search- Reading Levels
Image from: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/

It was awesome! It allowed me to assign a research topic for my students, and have my entire class’s reading ability range (from English Language Learners to advanced native speakers) to all find relevant information, in an appropriate reading level.

But that’s it. Those fun days are over. For some strange reason, one day out of the blue, the folks at Google decided to remove this feature. My 5th graders were outraged! “But why???”, “How can they do this?”, “What should we do now?”, “Can we call them and tell them to bring it back?” were only a few of the comments they had. Google Search- No Reading Levels

So here is my response:

Dear Google,

I am, and my students, and my school, and many millions of users love you so much.

We use Google Apps for Education at school, and we love how you introduced collaboration in Google Docs in such a smooth and simple way. We need to differentiate instruction, and Google Search has been my, and many others’, favorite way to do so.

Please bring it back!

Sincerely,

Ronen (A heart broken fan of Google Search)

Exploring SecondLife: The Kingdom of Kos

When I began my Second Life experience, I knew very little of how real these virtual worlds are to some people. I knew nothing of the functions, rules and role plays, or the characters’ abilities to communicate and interact with one another. I nonetheless decided to find my way around the Second Life ecosystem.

After traveling to several new dimensions and exploring deserted worlds on my own (due to time difference, I guess…), I finally arrived at the beautiful virtual world of “The Kingdom of Sand“.

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The Kingdom of Sand is an Arabian paradise of sand dunes, palaces and markets, canals and moats, tribes and princes, warriors and undead, servants and inn workers, slaves, and beautiful belly dancing music. Life happens quite slow in this hot and dry world, and people do not speak much. Watching wondering warriors looking for opponents gives a sense of sad and lonely atmosphere that is sometimes shaken by a few residents and visitors who eat, sleep, steal, fight, dance, and form alliances. From what I gathered, KoS used to be a lively part of the Second Life universe until a real life alliance broke and ate at the plot, slowly turning the Kingdom of Sand into a quiet and lawless place where old residents come to take a break of their real life and float down the canals reminiscing of days long past.

I spent a few days exploring this interesting world. Here is what I found at the Kingdom of Kos:

Once I bought my 3-day pass tag I was overwhelmed to see the number of weapons available for purchase. Since I never took part in a virtual world role play, I was unsure of what to expect. First, I did not have enough money to buy any weapon. Second, I was quite unsure about what this world was about, and third, being seen with weapons did not sound like a great idea, especially when some tall, sworded and mean-looking warriors were walking around and guarding temples…

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So I decided to skip the experience and walked around and explored the beautiful landscape.

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After enjoying the music, dense alleyways and endless dunes, I found a way to teleport myself into the Arena. I was not sure what to expect, and found a lone tall and muscular warrior. My 4-feet pink haired alien identity was terrified of the long axe he was holding, and my inexperience as a player caused rapid heart palpitations. Is he going to charge at me? Can he decapitate me if he does? What would happen to my character? Is there blood? Am I going to feel it? I had so many thoughts, and realized that without even noticing, I was slowly getting dragged into this magical world.

I spoke to the warrior who turned out to be a kind one, who provided me with some basic details about what it means to “fight” and how it takes place (some impressive cut-and-kill high jumps he had!), and about some of the roles in this VW. After asking for the weapons I held (what weapons? These are extensions of my body… :-/) and graciously not chopping my limbs off, he probably realized he won’t get to see my strange figure getting sliced. He thanked me for my interest, and he teleported away…

On my next trip to KoS, there were more avatars around, although they seemed to be ghosts passing through the world without my noticing. After exploring with no one interesting or interested around, I eventually identified a moving figure in a boat, so I decided to teleport myself to them. It was a very pleasant experience in which I learned so much about not only the kingdom, but also about the world’s designers and the relationships among them that brought the Kingdom of Sand to its current decline. I was impressed by this kind-mannered and melancholic old-timer (over 4 years of KoS existence…) who was apparently a prince in disguise, thanked him and wished him well.

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The long day in the hot sun got to me. I was ready for a break. After taking a quick bath I decided it was time to lay down and digest this crazy new experience…

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